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The Montana Almanac 1957
Great Northern Montana Station Names - 1937
Compiled Montana Place Names
Great Northern Mileposts - Alphabetically

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The Montana Almanac 1957
Great Northern Montana Station Names - 1937
Compiled Montana Place Names
Great Northern Mileposts - Alphabetically


INFORMATION/ FAQ

 

           
Great Northern Ry Origin of Station Names – 1937

The information available in this portion of "place names" is from the Great Northern Railway Origin of Station Names – 1937
attributed to Charles H. Moore and distributed by the

Great Northern Publicity Department

 Antelope – A village in Sheridan County, Montana. In early days herds of antelope inhabited this region, watering at the creek which came to be called Antelope Creek. The settlement that grew up here took the name of Antelope. Earliest settlers on the present site of Antelope were three Richardson brothers, Folsoms, Hedges and Ators. The town was incorporated from about 1917 to 1927.

Armington – A village in Cascade County, Montana. This settlement was built up on a ranch of one known as “Doc” Armington, hence the name.

Augusta  – A town in Lewis & Clark County, Montana. The name was given in honor daughter of D.J. Hogan, a prominent pioneer rancher. Mr. Hogan was foreman for Kon Kohrs who had large holdings in the vicinity at the time. The town was incorporated in 1883. Many years prior to this a band of Indians on the warpath came through here under Chief Joseph.

Bainville – A town in Roosevelt County, Montana. It was named in honor of C.M. Bain, an early settler, who is still living. The town was originally named Kilva, which was changed in 1904 to Bainville.

Barrows – A station on the Great Northern Railway in Judith Basin County, Montana. It was named after Mrs. Alice Barrows who lived about two miles from this point, at Old Ubet stage station.

Belt  – A town in Cascade County, Montana. The name originated from the fact that there is a belt-like rim of rock on the butte just east of the town. The first settler was John Castner who homesteaded the present townsite, and the town was incorporated in about 1882. The Anaconda Copper Mining Company opened coal mines here about1889 and the town grew rapidly for ten years, but the coal operations of the company were discontinued in 1910, since which time coal mining was reduced to a small scale.

Benchland – A town in Judith Basin County, Montana. The town was named by S.S. Hobson and is descriptive of the surrounding countryside.

Bernice  – A station on the Greta Northern Railway, in Jefferson County, Montana. The name was given in honor of Bernice Cannon, daughter of Charles W. Cannon of Helena, Vice President of the Montana Central Railroad.

Bickel – A station on the Greta Northern Railway, in Lewis &Clark County, Montana. Station was named after Paul Bickel, a civil engineer.

Big Sandy – A town in Chouteau County, Montana. Named after Big Sandy Creek, located a mile or so south of the town. The name was derived from the Blackfoot Indian name “Um-Es-Putcha-Eka,” meaning “Big Sandy Creek.” Likewise, Little Sandy Creek was called by the Indians “Ennuca-Es-Putcha-Eka.”

Billings – A city in Yellowstone County, Montana. The city was named in honor of Parmley Billings, oldest son of Fredrick Billings, President of the Northern Pacific Railway. In the winter of 1876-77 Messrs. P.W. McAdow, J.J. Alderson, Jospeh Cochran. Henry Cowell, Clinton Dills, Milton Summers, and others, founded the little village of Coulson around Mr. McAdow’s store, at a point about where the Northern Pacific Railway Bridge now spans the Yellowstone River. The village looked so promising that in 1878 the Minnesota and Montana Improvement Company attempted to purchase the site for more ambitious development, but were unable to make satisfactory arrangements with the Coulson people. The Improvement Company then laid out the village of Billings a short distance up the river, which soon surpassed Coulson. The original townsite of Billings was platted in March, 1882.

Bison – A station on the Great Northern Railway, Glacier County, Montana. So named because of the large herds of bison roaming in that vicinity in the early days.

Blackfoot  – A village in Glacier County, Montana. It was named from the Blackfoot Indian tribe of Indians.

Blair – A village in Roosevelt County, Montana. It was named in honor of Sidney D. Blair, an early resident.

Boulder – County seat of Jefferson County, Montana. The town was first settled in 1862, incorporated shortly thereafter and given the name Boulder from the Boulder River, which was so named account of the large granite boulders with which the banks of the river are lined. The settlement started as a stage station on the Virginia City – Last Change Gulch route, developed into a very active mining town serving the inland mining districts of Elkhorn, Comet and Baltimore. The Great Northern Railway was built through there in 1888. The State Schools for the Deaf, Blind and Feebleminded, established in 1892, are in Boulder.

Box Elder – A village in Hill County, Montana. This name was derived from great numbers of box elder trees growing in the region.

Brady – A town in Pondera County, Montana. The settlement was named in honor of Dr. Brady who was employed by the Towhey Brothers, contractors who constructed the narrow gauge railroad from Shelby to Great Falls about 1885. It is believed that an epidemic of smallpox broke out at the construction camp just at the time steel was being laid at this point and Dr. Brady came from Great Falls to attend the sick and check the disease.

Broadview  – A village in Yellowstone County, Montana. The name was suggested by Dr. Suddith, an early rancher, because of the wide view of the surrounding country from this point. Dr. Suddith’s ranch, located about three miles from there, was called “Fairview.”

Buffalo – A village in Fergus County, Montana. It was named after Buffalo Creek, which was derived from the great herds of buffalo in this region. The settlement was begun in 1908 when the Great Northern Billings Line was built.

Butte – A city in Silver Bow County, Montana. The city of Butte derives its name from the old French word “butte,” meaning “A rounded hill,” which is descriptive of the hill on which the city is located. It is the “mining Metropolis” of the Rocky Mountain Northwest and grew up from a little western mining camp established by two prospectors, Humphrey and Allison, in May, 1864.

Bynum  – A village in Teton County, Montana. The name was given in honor of Stephen Bynum, an early settler. The settlement was established in 1881 as a country post office and small store on the bank of Muddy Creek for the convenience of stock growers in that region.

Carter  – A Town in Chouteau County, Montana. Originally the settlement was named Sidney, but in 1905 the Great Northern Railway changed the name to Carter in honor of Thomas Carter, U.S. Senator.

Cascade  – A town in Cascade County, Montana. Both town and county were named for the great waterfalls in the Missouri River.

Chappell  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, Chouteau County, Montana. The Post Office Department uses the name “Loma.” The town was originally named “Marias” and was later changed to “Loma.”  The Railway Company for many years used the name of Loma, but in about 1915 or 1916 changed the name to “Chappell” in order to avoid confusion in handling freight shipments consigned to “Lohman” and “Loma.” This name was chosen because the owner of the townsite was Mr. Edward Chappell, still living at Loma, age 76 [1937] who homesteaded this property in 1888 and gave his permission to use his name. Whenever the Railway Company required more right-of-way to build elevators or new tracks, it was necessary to go to Mr. Chappell for it. However, the Post Office Department refuses to change the name of its office.

 Chester  – A town in Liberty County, Montana. The name was given by the first telegraph operator after his hometown in Pennsylvania.

Chinook  – A town in Blaine County, Montana. The early settlement was named Belknap, later changed to Dawes. The latter name was not satisfactory to settlers, and upon suggestion of E.R. McGinnis, Great Northern Immigration Agent, the name of “Chinook” was adopted. The reason is that this region is subject to Chinook winds. 

Choteau  – A town in Teton County, Montana. This name was given in honor of Pierre Choteau, Jr., president of the American Fur Company, who brought the first steamboat up the Missouri River to Fort Benton. The settlement began as a trading post.

Citadel  – A station on the Great Northern Railway in Flathead County, Montana. It was formerly named Coram, but was changed by the Railway Company to make it suggestive of Glacier National Park.

Clancy  – A village in Jefferson County, Montana. The town was so named because it was adjacent to Clancy Creek, which was named in honor of Judge Clancy, a pioneer who died in 1862. In the days when silver and gold mining was at its height in this region, Clancy was an important freight terminal on the line between Butte and Helena, and prior to construction of the railroad it was on the direct route followed by horse, mule and ox teams transporting gold and silver from the Virginia City mines to the Government Assay Office at Helena. This makes Clancy one of the oldest communities in the state. 

Collins – A village in Teton County, Montana. The name was given in honor of Timothy E. Collins, a resident of Fort Benton, who was a stockholder and director of the Great Falls & Canada Railroad. This railroad was a narrow gauge line which was built in about 1890 from Great Falls to Lethbridge.

Comanche  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Yellowstone County, Montana. The name was derived from the horse “Comanche,” the sole survivor of the Custer Battle, and was first applied to the creek in the vicinity and later also the station.

Conrad – A town in Pondera County, Montana. Named for W.G. Conrad, one of the founders of the town.

Corbin  – A village in Jefferson County, Montana. Named for D.C. Corbin, pioneer prospector and builder of the Spokane Falls & Northern Railroad in the State of Washington.

SORRYthe list including the rest of the “C’s” “D’s” and “E’s” was missing from my booklet – if someone has a copy of this publication – I would appreciate getting a copy of this page.

Flaxville  – A village in Daniels County, Montana. Flax was about the only grain grown in this territory in the early days, hence the name “Flaxville” was adopted. The original settlement was “Boyer” and located about two and one-half miles southwest of the present site of Flaxville. It was moved to its present location when the railway was built.

Fort Belknap  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Blaine County, Montana. It is believed the name was given in honor of Robert L. Belknap.

Fort Benton  – A town in Chouteau County, Montana. Tha name was given on January 1, 1850, for Thomas Hart Benton, statesman from North Carolina.

Fort Browning  – A town in Glacier County, Montana. Fort Browning was named in honor of C.H. Browning, Secretary of the Interior, 1868.

Fortine  – A valley in Lincoln County, Montana. The settlement was named after Octave Fortine, was an early settler in that vicinity.

Fort Shaw  – A village in Cascade County, Montana. Original name of this place was Camp Reynolds, an army post having been established there in 1867. Name was changed to Fort Shaw in honor of Col. Robert F. Shaw, who was killed at Fort Wagner in 1863.

Four Buttes  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Daniels County, Montana. This name is descriptive of a nearby formation of four buttes, which is visible for miles. Old-timers called them “Whiskey Buttes.”

Fowler   – A village in Pondera County, Montana. This settlement was established in 1903 and named after B.R. Fowler, pioneer sheep and cattleman who had large holdings on the Dry Fork River nearby.

Frazer  – A town in Valley County, Montana. It was named for the foreman of a grading crew during time the railroad was constructed through this region.

Froid  – A town in Roosevelt County, Montana. The name was suggested by Division Engineer Charles A. Walker, who selected it form an old map of Nebraska.

Flume  – A station on the Great Northern Railway in Teton County, Montana. So named because of a large irrigation flume is located there.

Gary  – A village in Cascade County, Montana. This place was originally named Sunnyside and was rebuilt in 1930- 33 as a dude ranch, known as Gary Cooper Ranches, Inc., 7 Bar Nine. The name was changed on March 1, 1930, to Gary, after Gary Cooper, movie actor, who grew up in this vicinity.

Gearing  – A village in Lewis & Clark County, Montana. It is believed the settlement was named after Thomas D. Gearing, early rancher in this vicinity.

Geyser  – A village in Judith Basin County, Montana. Its name was obtained from the fact of its nearness to a stagecoach overnight stopping point on the trail from Leiwstown to the Falls, at which place were springs that were really small geysers.

Gilman  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Lewis & Clark County, Montana. This station was named in honor of L.C. Gilman, vice president of the Great Northern Railway, now retired.

Gordon  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Cascade County, Montana. This station was named for a Mr. Gordon who was a foreman for the T.G. Power Company, which concern had extensive land holdings in that vicinity.

Hauck  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Judith Basin County, Montana. Station was named for John C. Hauck, early homesteader at that point. Wheat and other products were hauled to the elevator here.

Havre  – A city in Hill County, Montana. This name was given by Gus de Cules in 1892 after the City of Le Havre, France.

Hedgesville  – A village in Wheatland County, Montana. This place was named in honor of W.A. Hedges, a pioneer rancher in the vicinity.

Helena  – A Capital city of Montana, located in Lewis & Clark County. In 1864 at a miners’ meeting held in Last Chance Gulch, John Sommerville suggested the name of Helena, after Helena, Minnesota, his former home.

Hidden Lake  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Flathead County, Montana. Formerly named Garry. Changed on February 7, 1926 to Hidden Lake because a beautiful lake lies “hidden” in the nearby forest.

Hobson  – A town in Judith Basin County, Montana. The settlement from which Hobson grew was about four miles west of Hobson, at the Fort Benton trail crossing of Judith River, and was named Philbrook. When the Great Northern Railway built its line through here, the post office was moved to the present site of Hobson. A controversy arose as the whether the new post office would be named Philbrook or Hobson, until finally the Postal Authorities adopted the new name of Hobson in honor of S.S. Hobson, wealthy rancher and member of the legislature.    

Hogeland  – A village in Blaine County, Montana. The name was given in honor of Mr. A.H. Hogeland who was for many years Chief Engineer of the Great Northern Railway.

Judith Gap  – A town in Wheatland County, Montana. The famous Lewis & Clark Expedition named the region surrounding the town. Judith was the name of Captain Lewis’ “Sweetheart.” “Gap” was chosen as descriptive of the valley between the two mountains.

Kalispell  – A city in Flathead County, Montana. Named after the Kalispell tribe of Indians, which lived in that vicinity.

Kevin  – A town in Toole County, Montana. It was named after Thomas Kevin, superintendent of the Alberta Railway & Irrigation Company.

Kila  – A village in Flathead County, Montana. When the post office was originally applied for, it was under the name Kiley in honor of an old-time settler. As there was already another Kiley post office in the state, the name was changed to Kila under which the post office was established.

Kingston  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Fergus County, Montana. This place was named in honor of Joe and Anton King, brothers, pioneer operators of a large cattle ranch in that neighborhood.

Kolin  – A village in Judith Basin County, Montana. Many people of Bohemian descent lived in this locality and therefore the settlement was named Kolin after a city in Bohemia, pronounced K-lene, accent on the last syllable.

Ledger  – A village in Pondera County, Montana. This settlement was established in 1913 on the Dry Fork River and was named Ledger for a prominent rancher by the name of Ledgerwood. The name was soon changed to Ledger wood to avoid confusion with Ledger, North Dakota, but a few years later it was again changed to Ledger.

Lewistown  – A city in Fergus County, Montana. In 1874 a company of the Seventh U.S. Infantry was sent from Fort Shaw to establish a summer camp along the trade route between Judith Basin trading posts and the Missouri River for the purpose of protecting this road against the Indians. The encampment was named “Camp Lewis” after Major William H. Lewis, a popular officer of the Seventh Infantry. Later on a trading post was established at the camp and a rival post was established about a half a mile away. From these two settlements grew the present city of Lewistown, so named when a post office was established there in 1883.

Manchester   – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Cascade County, Montana. Named after the Manchester Woolen Mills in Vermont, who had an old woolen mill at this location which is still standing along the river.

Manrock [Malta]   – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Richland County, Montana. A short distance southeast of the station is a rock resembling a man, hence the name “Manrock.”

Matador   – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Blaine County, Montana. It was originally named Montauk, but in 1915 the name was changed to Matador for the Matador Land & Cattle Company, a large Texas concern who handled cattle in this vicinity.

McCabe  – A village in Roosevelt County, Montana. Helena Historical Library name index indicates that the town was named after a local rancher by that name. Incidentally, while interviewing local residents it developed that no one seems to know how this name originated, but one party made the statement that “perhaps early settlers were unwilling to have their names go down in history as it is rumored many of them came from Texas, leaving there with but a horse and arriving here with a herd of cattle.”   

Medicine Lake  – A town in Sheridan County, Montana. This town takes its name from nearby Medicine Lake, a body of water so named by the Indians because they found many of their medicinal herbs and roots around its shores and because the water itself had medicinal qualities.

Merino   – A small village in Judith Basin County, Montana. This name was derived from the fact that large numbers of the Merino breed of sheep were raised in the neighboring ranches.

Midby   – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Sheridan County, Montana. It was named after a pioneer resident of the vicinity.

Monarch   – A village in Cascade County, Montana. It was established in 1890 by the Great Northern Railway and called Monarch Junction, but soon dropped the “junction.” Three adjacent mining claims at that time were known as “King,” “Czar,” and “Emperor,” and it is believed this was the reason the name of “Monarch” was chosen.

Mossmain   – A village in Yellowstone County, Montana. The settlement was named for P.G. Moss of Billings.

Naismith   – A station on then Great Northern Railway, in Toole County, Montana. The name was in honor of a Mr. Naismith, who was the first superintendent of the old narrow gauge Montana Central Railroad.

Nashua   – A town in Valley County, Montana. This is an old Indian name, believed to mean “confluence of the streams.” The Porcupine and Milk Rivers meet at this location, and a few miles downstream is the confluence with the Missouri River.   

Neihart  – A village in Cascade County, Montana. The town was named in honor of James L. Neihart, A prospector, who became the first mayor. Mr. Neihart together with John C. O’Brien and Richard Harley, came to this vicinity as prospectors in the summer of 1881 and located a rich silver and lead deposit. By April, 1882, the population had increased to such an extant that it was decided to call a meeting to organize a town and government. The meeting was held in the open air and John O’Brien was the chairman, his chair being a boulder. Neihart was unanimously selected as the name.

Nihill  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Wheatland County, Montana. This station was named after Pat Nihill, an early settler who is still living in that vicinity.

Nohle   – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Richland County, Montana. This station was named after A.F. Nohle, landowner in the vicinity.

Olney  – A village in Flathead County, Montana. The settlement was named for an early homesteader in that vicinity.

Opheim  – A town in Valley County, Montana. The town was established in 1910 and was called Old Opheim after Mr. Alfred S. Opheim, early homesteader, on whose lnad the townsite was located. Mrs. Opheim served as first postmistress, 1910 to 1914, and then Mr. Opheim became postmaster serving until December 1933, and still lives there. In 1926 the Great Northern Railway built its branch out there, the townsite was moved one-quarter mile northwest of the old townsite and the name became Opheim.

Oswego  – A village in Valley County, Montana. Railroad officials named the settlement after Oswego, New York.

Painted Robe  – A station on the Greta Northern Railway, in Golden Valley County, Montana. This name was derived from the fact that the Indians, while hunting and trapping in the vicinity, painted their robes at this place, using a certain kind of clay available in the creek bed.

Peerless  – A village in Daniels County, Montana. The settlement was originally named Tande. Due to “Peerless Beer” being sold at Tande, people were in the habit of saying, “Let’s go get Peerless.” This gave rise to the desire to have the name of Tande changed to Peerless, to which the Post Office Department first objected but finally agreed to change.

Pendroy  – A town in Teton County, Montana. This name was given in honor of L.B. Pendroy, personal friend of James J. Hill, whom Mr. Hill met when scouting over the country west of Devils Lake, N.D., in 1885, prior to the survey.

Pershing  – A siding on the Great Northern Railway, Pondera County, Montana. It is believed the location was named in honor of General John J. Pershing, as the siding was constructed during World War I when the railroads were operated by the U.S. Railroad Administration.

Plentywood  – A town in Sheridan County, Montana. During frontier days the surrounding region, particularly along the creek bearing the same name, was thickly wooded. The Indians usually said, “Always there was plenty wood, good winter camp.” When cattlemen arrived, they referred to the locality as “that place where there is plenty wood.” It is easy to understand why the name “Plentywood” was adopted when the first post office was established there.

Poplar  – A town in Roosevelt County, Montana. Situated at the confluence of the Poplar and Missouri Rivers. The name Poplar was derived from the large number of Polar trees growing along the banks of this river. Formerly Fort Poplar, an old trading post built in 1833 by C.A. Chardon of the American Fur Company.

Raynesford  – A village in Judith Basin County, Montana. The land for the townsite was obtained by purchase from Edmund R. Huggins who homesteaded the land in 1891. This was in 1907 when the Billings & Northern Railroad was building through this region and the railroad contractor had one of his camps near here and obtained camp supplies, etc. from the Huggins ranch. The camp and later on the town was named Raynesford in honor of Mrs. Huggins, whose maiden name was Miss Raynesford.

Red Eagle  – A station on the Great Northern Railway in Flathead County, Montana. This locality was so named in honor of a prominent chief of the Blackfoot tribe of Indians.

Redstone  – A village in Sheridan County, Montana. This name was adopted on account of the redstone formation in the bluffs of that vicinity.

Reserve  – A village in Sheridan County, Montana. This name was derived from the fact that the settlement is located on the northeast corner of Fort Peck Indian Reservation, and was named by the Railway Company when the branch was built in 1910, being only a siding at that time. The post office was established in 1911.

Riceville  – A village in Cascade County, Montana. Named in honor of its founder, Daniel Rice.

Richey  – A town in Dawson County, Montana. Town was named after Clyde Richey, Postmaster, in 1916 when then railroad was built in there.

Riebeling – A station on the Great Northern Railway in Lewis & Clark County, Montana. It was named for Henry J. Riebeling, rancher, from whom the Great Northern Railway purchased the land for the townsite.

Rising Wolf  – A station on the Great Northern Railway in Glacier County, Montana. This was the name, which the Indians gave to Hugh Monro, the first white man in Glacier Park. The place was first named “Lubec” but in February 1926 was changed to Rising Wolf.

Rossfork  – A village in Fergus County, Montana. Was named for the river on which it is situated. This stream is a “fork” of the Judith River and was named “Rossfork” River after a pioneer family by the name of “Ross.” The town is located only a short distance from its confluence with the Judith River.

Scobey  – A town in Daniels County, Montana. Named after Major Scobey, who was one of the early Indian agents stationed at Poplar, Montana.

Shelby  – A town in Toole County, Montana. It was named in honor of Peter O. Shelby, general manager of the Montana Central Railway.

Shorey  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Yellowstone County, Montana. It was named in 1908 after an old settler who owned a ranch nearby.

Sieben  – A station on the Great Northern Railway in Leiws And Clark County, Montana. Back in pioneer days this was a stage station on the freight route between Fort Benton and Helena. It was later changed to “Sieben” after Henry Sieben who still owns and operates a ranch near there and now lives in Helena.

Silver City  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Lewis & Clark County, Montana. In 1860 a man named Silver and his wife were traveling through this country on horseback when his wife died. She was buried along a creek where gold later was discovered; the creek was named after the man “Silver Creek.” When the Great Northern Railway built its line through, they called the station “Silver.” Confusion in reading this name on a train order caused a head-on collision at Seiben. Therefore, on August 25, 1925 the Railway Company changed it to “Silver City.”

Simms  – A town in Cascade County, Montana. This town was named after an early homesteader who settled nearby and also established the post office.

Slayton  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Golden Valley County, Montana. It was named for D.W. Slayton, a prominent sheepman of the region.

Spotted Robe  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Glacier County, Montana. The station was first named “Kilroy,” but on February 7, 1926, the present name was substituted in honor of a former chief of the Blackfoot tribe of Indians.

Sprole  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Roosevelt County, Montana. The name was given in honor of Major Sprole, an Indian agent who at one time was in charge of Fort Peck.

Stanford  – A town in Judith Basin County, Montana. In 1880 two brothers, J. E. Arthur and G. Calvin Bower, acme to this country with 1,000 sheep where they acquired 100,000 acres of land and commenced sheep ranching. When a new town arose in Judith Basin they named it Stanford after Stanfordville, New York, their home town.

Stryker  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Lincoln County, Montana. This station was named after Dave Stryker, who kept a stage station on the old Fort Steele trail passing through this point.

Sunburst  – A town in Toole County, Montana. In the spring of 1907 a young man named W.G. Davis moved from Alberta, Canada, to his new ranch in Montana located in the shadow of West Butte, one of three small mountains commonly known as the Sweet Grass Hills, the other two being named East Butte and Gold Butte. Early one morning while looking after his flock of sheep, young Davis saw the sun suddenly burst over West Butte spreading myriads of colors over the morning sky. He was so impressed that he named his land “Sunburst Ranch.” A few years later Mr. Davis acquired more land and in 1913 together with Bill O’Haire and Albert Goeddertz, neighboring landowners, he helped organize the community and plat a townsite, part of which was located on Mr. Davis’ “Sunburst Ranch.” It was incorporated in 1925 and at the suggestion of Mr. Davis called “Sunburst.” This was a sparsely settled and peaceful cattle, sheep and faring country until in 1922 Gordon Campbell, a geologist, discovered oil, which started a boom. Today the Texas Oil Company has developed one of the most modern and up-to-date refineries in the United States, capable of producing about 5,000 barrels per day.

Sundance  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Glacier County, Montana. The original name of the station was Seville. It was changed to its present name in commemoration of the Indian “sun dance’ on January 11, 1926.

Sun River   – A village in Cascade County, Montana. Named after the Sun River on  which it is located. The name was derived from the Indian words “Nataeosueti,” translated by the French as “Medicine” or “Sun” river.

Sweet Grass  – A town in Toole County, Montana, near the Canadian Boundary. It was named after the Sweet Grass Hills nearby. So named because of the abundance of “sweet grass’ growing on these hill and surrounding country.

Trego  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Lincoln County, Montana. This name was given in honor of Mrs. A.H. Hogeland, wife of former Chief Engineer of the Great Northern Railway, whose maiden name was Anna Trego.

Turner  – A village in Blaine County, Montana. The name was given in honor of Henry Turner in 1914, pioneer cattle rancher and proprietor of first store in the settlement. When the railroad was built through in 1928, the town was moved two miles to its present location.

Ulm – A village in Cascade County, Montana. This town was named after William “Bill” Ulm, pioneer and large landowner on whose property the townsite was located. The first post office was established in 1883 and the Great Northern Railway built its line through in 1887, purchasing right -of-way from Mr. Ulm.

Vaughn  – A village in Cascade County, Montana. It was named in honor of Robert Vaughn who came to this country in 1860 as a rancher. Later on Mr. Vaughn wrote a book on the history of Montana.

Vebar  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Golden Valley County, Montana. It is believed that name was derived from the Ve-Bar brand used on an adjoining cattle ranch.

Virgelle  – A village Choteau County, Montana. The name is a combination of the first name of Virgil Blankenbaker and the first of his wife, Ella Blankenbaker, forming Virgelle. Virgil Blankenbaker was a prominent sheep rancher and at one time was elected state senator. He met death in an automobile accident in June 1936.

Vista  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Flathead County, Montana. So named because of the beautiful view of Whitefish Lake and the mountains.

Walton  – A village in Flathead County, Montana. The settlement was named for Izaak Walton, author and outdoor man.

Wickes  – A station on the Great Northern Railway, in Jefferson County, Montana. This place was named for W.W. Wickes, engineer and promoter of the Alta Mining Company.

Windham  – A village in Judith Basin County, Montana. It is located in Sage Creek Valley where L.H. Hamilton in 1880 started sheep raising on a large scale, forming the Sage Creek Sheep Company. In 1907 when the railroad was built through, Hamilton and others laid out a townsite and named it Windham, for Windham County, Vermont, his former home. First choice had been Hamilton, but there already was a Hamilton, Montana.

Wiota  – A town in Valley County, Montana. This settlement was originally named “Milk River,” but was changed January 21, 1910, to Wiota from the Indian word meaning “many snows.”

Wolf Creek  – A village in Lewis & Clark County, Montana. In early days this settlement was named “Carterville,” but took its present name from the nearby creek. This creek was named by the Indians who called it the creek that the wolf jumped in.

Wolf Point  – A town in Roosevelt County, Montana. One winter in the 1860’s the hunters killed such a large number of wolves that they froze before the skins could be removed. The frozen carcasses were piled up to await the coming of spring and formed such a large pile as to be a landmark for miles around and hunters referred to it as “Wolf Point.” The place is about two miles southwest of the present townsite.  _____________________________________________________________________________________________

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